About your Search

20100927
20100927
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
." join us with your calls, e- mail's end tweets next sunday at noon eastern on c-span3 book tv. >> now, the washington institute for near east policy post a discussion on leadership of the oilseeds of saddam hussein. documents were captured in iraq in 2003 and provided scholars with an inside view of the iraqi regime _ sought -- saddam hussein's leadership. they have archived the materials. this is about 1.5 hours. >> good afternoon ladies and gentleman. my name is michael eisenstaedt. i am a senior fellow and director of the studies program at the washington institute of near east policy. almost three years to the day this week marks the start of the iraq war. it led to a series of events in a bloody eight year war between iran and iraq which contributed to the 1991 gulf war which in turn set up a decade of sanctions and containment of iraq followed by the 2003 invasion of iraq by the united states and its coalition partners which leads us to where we are today. one of the consequences of the invasion of iraq was that the united states government's possession of massive numbers of gov
asked them to send out messages to the world about the horror of the use of nuclear weapons. only those with firsthand experience can convey this. japan will coordinate with other countries and civil society to promote education on disarmament and non-proliferation issues. last december, demand -- japan's amended renewed determination toward the total elimination of nuclear weapons which was adopted in the general assembly with the united states as a co- sponsor for the first time. japan is determined to continue its efforts to strengthen the trend of broadening support for the resolution in the international community. steady implementation of the agreement of the conference in may is essential. japan and australia have coasted foreign ministers meeting on nuclear disarmament and non-poor operation on the opening of a new general assembly session. we have launched a new group dedicated to working toward a world without nuclear weapons. we intend to deep in discussions on reducing the role and a number of nuclear weapons and the world. -- in the world. i must make reference to the democ
for being with us from the north slope. can you talk a little bit about the interaction you have had with shell and their plans to develop up there and whether the is use your raise in your testimony you have been able to address satisfactorily or if there are other issues you would like resolved before they proceed? >> thank you, commissioner. the overriding concern continues to be the possibility of an oil spill. [inaudible] our problem is the oil spill equipment and the technology has never been tested here in the arctic in real-life situations due to the rules of the united states. because there has never been any real exercise here in the arctic involving broken ice conditions and the recovery of oil. it is the burning that is being mentioned, the technology being used in warmer waters, it has never been done up here and that continues to be our concern. it is difficult to take the words of industry and agencies just that their words. that is the overriding condition. the least-sale provisions i mentioned earlier continue to be the focus for the lower 48 waters. the time frame f
of the impossible." join us with your phone calls booktv.ts on c-span2's >> new gingrich was first elected in 1978 and served as speaker of the house from 1995 until 1999. since leaving congress, he has written more than 20 books and is an analyst on the fox news channel. our conversation includes his early years in politics, his tenure and his views on the obama administration, his conversion to catholicism and his possible reentry into the gop presidential race. this is about 40 minutes. >> we have -- >> what is the state of ourwe learn -- we have to learn how to compete with china, how to deal with radical islam, and how to deal with our deficit. those are going to be difficult challenges. >> you have used the word radical in description of this president. why do you use that word? >> 55% of the american people believe he is a socialist. his policies represent such a huge increase in power in washington. a health care bill the country overwhelmingly wants to appeal, a massive intrusion of government into your life in a way that is just amazing. a financial reform bill that radically centralizes
spurred that the national and local level the u.s. will lose. what do you think? the numbers to call -- you can also e-mail us. and we are on twitter. "curb corruption or lose the war" from "the wall street journal." the author of "why vietnam matters. " he draws on his own experience in vietnam. he starts out by saying -- so, what do you think? curb corruption or losing the war? will that be putting the american effort in jeopardy in afghanistan? "the wall street journal" has this piece. the piece says -- our question for you this morning, is there a danger in the u.s. losing the war in afghanistan do to problems of corruption, and bought more perhaps by the cia, trying to do the right thing and aligning itself with informants, but did they take advantage of the system? "the washington post" has an excerpt modified from "obama's wars." uc and in this year, president obama visiting arlington national -- you see in this here, president obama visiting arlington national cemetery. the peace in "the washington post" says -- so, we are seeing a little bit of the behind-the-scenes give- an
guest has been david armor. thank you for being with us this morning. that is all for "washington journal" this morning. we will be back tomorrow morning at 7:00 eastern to take your calls. have a good day. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . . çççç-our live coverageç ofe afternoon session will be here ççthe commission will hear frm people that deal with oil spills inçç alaska.% çtheçç session beginsçç at0 er(kspan. ççççççdavid axelrodçç jd ççpolitico in a decision onçe 2010 midterm elections. our look atçç privacy and communication policies by focusing onç the federalç laws that limit data collection. ç >> this was the second time that the court heard the case. earlier this year a two judge panel from the ninth circuit overturned laws because they were disproportionately affecting minorities. this is just over one hour. >> good afternoon. we are here they hear the argument [unintelligible] and we have judged gould appearing by video from seatt
not quite in the way many of us could have expected. but the chance came and you - we - responded with real courage and conviction. cynics expected us to back away. instead, we confounded those who said that coalition government was impossible. we created a government which will govern and govern well for the next five years. thate will govern and govern well for the next five years. of course, there are those who condemn us. we are challenging years of tradition, but i am so, so proud of the quiet courage and determination which you have shown through these momentous times in british political history. hold a warners and we will have changed -- holding ourerve, we will have changed british politics for good. hold our nerve, and we will change britain for dead. -- for good. [applause] just think of what we have done already. we have changed the injustice of the rich paying less on their investments and then the poor do on their wages. we have rolled back a generation of liberal and intrusive legislation. , the banksar's day will pay a new levy that will help fill the black hole of they help
to you about well this weekend, i have to go back to mississippi for a family reunion. >> give us a brief idea of what the book is about? >> the book is about the defection of 6 million african-americans from the south to the north, mid-west to the west. from 1915-1970 when the south began truly to change. >> i went to a movie last weekend. they handed me this as i went in. i'll read it to you. everyday more migrants are coming no the cities to seek a better life for their children. >> i wrote this book thinking of any country. it's a movie about the last train home where they have 150 million migrant that's live in the city each year. i want to talk to you about what you have written in the front of your book by richard wright. >> who was he and why did you pick him? >> richard wright was one of the greatest novelists of the 20 j century. he was a migrant from mississippi to chicago. he was the son of a share cropper and always wanted to write. i set out in 1927 to get to chicago. he spent almost his entire career. almost everything he wrote had to do with understanding the migrant exper
experience in washington. it was a national outpouring of people. >> just give us a brief synopsis of what the book is about. >> the book is about the migration experiences of three people that have become part of the larger whole, which was the defection of 6 million african americans from the south to the north, to the midwest and west from 1915, world war i until 1970. >> i went to a movie last weekend. they handed me this. i want to read it to you. every day, more migrants are coming into the cities to seek a better life for their children. the scale of this massive migration from the poor countryside to the burgeoning cities is unprecedented in human history. the migrants provide a cheap source of labor booming cities and the thriving economy is built on the backs of those citizens. do you have any idea what country that is? >> i am thinking the united states. i wrote this book with the idea that it would refer to almost every immigrant that crossed the atlantic or the pacific ocean in order to come here. >> it is the movie called "the last train home." they had 130 million migrants t
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)